SHOTLIST:

AP Television - AP Clients Only

January 13, 2013

1. Mid shot of 787 Dreamliner

2. SOUNDBITE: Kevin Hiatt, CEO & President, Flight Safety Foundation: "It's a good move made by the department of transportation, the FAA and Boeing to come out and do a complete look again at the certification process of the aircraft.

3. Mid shot of 787 Dreamliner taxing on runway

4. Wide shot of 787 Dreamliner taxing on runway

5. SOUNDBITE: Kevin Hiatt, CEO & President, Flight Safety Foundation: "We also encourage them to take a look at their own internal procedures to make sure that they are keeping up with this new modern technology aircraft."

6. Wide shot: JAL's 787 jet at the gate

7. Close up: The JAL logo on the jetliner's tail section

8. SOUNDBITE: Kevin Hiatt, CEO & President, Flight Safety Foundation: "As a matter of fact the passengers should be happy that this is taking place to further allay any type of misconceptions about the airplane."

9. Medium shot: Ramp workers near the cargo hold

10. TIGHT shot: Ramp workers preparing to load luggage into the cargo hold

11. SOUNDBITE: Kevin Hiatt, CEO & President, Flight Safety Foundation: "New airliners all have operational issues that crop up in their first months of operation, but this airplane is built so well with a lot of redundant systems that it's really no serious concern, except for the APU battery situation which we've got the NTSB taking a look at so I believe that it's going to be ok to fly.

12. Close up: The jet's tail section with the words Boeing 787 clearly visible

13. SOUNDBITE: Kevin Hiatt, CEO & President, Flight Safety Foundation: "The FAA along with Boeing and the department of transportation have all come together and they're doing everything that they can right now to continue to ensure that airline and flight safety is the first."

14. Close shot of plane fuselage reading "Dreamliner"

15. Mid shot of Dreamliner taking off

STORYLINE:

Boeing's 787 Dreamliner had a nightmare of a week, capped off Friday by the Federal Aviation Administration's decision to review everything about the new airplane, including its entire design and manufacturing process.

Government officials were quick to say that the jet is safe _ nearly 50 of them are in the skies. However, a fire Monday and a subsequent spate of technical problems stirred serious concerns.

None of the eight airlines using the plane plans to stop flying it during the government's inquiry, and passengers flying the 787 don't appear to be worried about their safety. But the extensive review raised a host of questions:

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