Shadow treasurer Chris Bowen believes the federal government should urgently release the mid-year budget review, which he says is becoming more of a mini-budget than an update.

Treasurer Joe Hockey and Assistant Treasurer Arthur Sinodinos are due to ditch a host of unlegislated tax proposals that have been stuck in the pending tray dating back to 2001.

Of the 92 unlegislated and unresolved tax and superannuation changes outstanding, the government will proceed with just 18, while a further three initiatives will be significantly amended.

The government will "definitely not" proceed with seven initiatives including the former Labor government's $1.8 billion change to the fringe benefit tax on cars - a pledge made during the election campaign - because of the impact it will have on the car industry.

It will also scrap a proposed tax on superannuation pension earnings above $100,000.

Senator Sinodinos will lead consultations on the remaining 64 measures with a disposition not to proceed with them.

The government is already getting rid of the carbon tax, as well as the mining taxes and most of the initiatives tied to it.

"The government's priorities and values are just wrong," Mr Bowen said in a statement.

He said it is giving tax breaks to 16,000 people with super balances of more than $2 million, while reimposing super tax for millions of low- and middle-income earners.

It is also giving large multinational businesses a tax break while increasing the tax burden on small businesses.

He again called for the release of the mid-year economic and fiscal outlook.

"It's actually not just an update anymore, it's Joe Hockey's mini-Budget."

Australian Greens Leader Christine Milne said the government had campaigned on there being a budget emergency.

"The budget emergency has gone missing since the election," she told reporters in Hobart.

"This is yet another way of attacking and making life harder, and with greater pressure on poorer people in Australia and letting the rich off the hook.

"How is that fair?"