Near Damascus, a rare moment of good will between the Syrian government and rebels.

They've worked together to allow some 1,800 civilians flee a nearby besieged town, where rebels claims some 12,000 residents face starvation.

(SOUNDBITE) (Arabic) UNIDENTIFIED RESIDENT OF MOUADAMIYA, SAYING:

"I was living in terror and now I am free and safe with the army, thank god. God bless you"

The unlikelihood of this cooperation isn't lost on this refugee, thankful to both sides for making this possible.

(SOUNDBITE) (Arabic) UNIDENTIFIED RESIDENT OF MOUADAMIYA, SAYING:

"Those are my children and those are my children. I am eighty-three year old. I do not know anybody who was bad to me from any side. Thank god. You are all my children."

Of course, for scores of refugees already outside Syria, life is anything but easy.

Some 600,000 are in Turkey alone, many living in public parks.

Nazhat Hanan's family is lucky to have a roof over their heads, but still…

(SOUNDBITE) (Arabic) SEVIN MAHO'S MOTHER, NAZHAT HANNAN, SAYING:

"There are four families living together in this house, each one has a room. The conditions are very difficult. We are trying to learn Turkish so that we can hopefully get a job. Both myself and my husband are lawyers."

All this, and peace seems so far away.

The UN envoy to Syria met with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on Wednesday, but hoped-for peace talks in November are unlikely to happen.

If there is hope, it's more likely among the young generation of refugees, like Hanan's nine year old daughter Sevin.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) SYRIAN STUDENT, SEVIN MAHO, SAYING:

"I want to be a writer, writing English stories. I love English so much."

She'll have a lot to write about.

The conflict in her homeland has killed over 100,000 people, and continues to claim over a hundred lives each day.

 

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