Increasing wealth and a dictum from the Chinese government that workers need to take more vacations for their health and wellbeing is driving a huge surge in overseas tourism.

Last year Chinese tourists spent more than $100 billion on international travel, making it the world's largest tourism source market in terms of spending.

An increasing proportion of that spending is landing in Australia as cashed up Chinese increasingly take their holidays here.

China now rivals New Zealand as the number one source market for international tourists in Australia.

China's largest outbound tour company GZL International Travel is based in Guangzhou in China.

Product manager for GZL in Australia and New Zealand Janice Mao says what the Chinese want from their holidays in Australia is not more casinos.

"Gambling is not a very attractive factor for us," Ms Mao said.

It is Australia's wide open spaces and natural beauty that is enticing more and more Chinese tourists to spend their holidays in here.

The package holidays at GZL are offering more adventurous and unique activities than casinos, such as the sculpture by the sea expedition at Bondi beach in October and strawberry picking on the Mornington peninsula.

More than 625,000 Chinese visited Australia last year - a rise of 16 per cent compared to the previous year, making China the second biggest source market for international tourists behind New Zealand.

But the Chinese a bigger spenders than New Zealanders.

Last year, the amount of spending from Chinese tourists was a staggering $US4.2 billion.

Jill Collins, Australian Consul-General in Guangzhou says for the first half of 2013, they had seen close to twenty percent increase in the number of Chinese tourists going to Australia.

"The projections from Tourism Australia are that by 2020 we're looking at over a million Chinese tourists visiting Australia," Ms Collins said.

"In fact, those projections may even be a little bit conservative."

It's the rapid rise in Chinese tourism that is fuelling the aggressive expansion of the Chinese airline industry globally.

But analysts say Australians still need some convincing to choose a Chinese carrier despite the markedly cheaper fares.

Guangzhou based China's Southern Airlines, which is Asia's biggest carrier, is using Australia as a testing ground for its international expansion plans.

It has grown its Australian services from seven flights per week in 2009 to currently flying forty-six weekly flights.

This week China's Southern Airlines are adding a new A380 super jumbo service between Guangzhou and sydney.

 

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