Police in Russia are cracking down on migrants.

In Moscow, more than 1,000 people have been detained.

Officials are searching for a suspect in the fatal stabbing of a man last week that is being blamed on a migrant.

The crime has sparked the biggest outbreak of anti-migrant unrest in the capital in several years.

The unrest even caused a riot on Sunday when a group stormed a vegetable market where many migrants work.

One local shop vendor, who posted a flyer of the murder suspect's photo on her store, supports the crackdown.

(SOUNDBITE) (Russian) SHOP VENDOR TATYANA, SAYING:

"This rally should have prompted our authorities to take some measures. I doubt it will happen though. Quite the opposite - things will get only nastier, the migrants will continue to pick people off one by one and... and I just can't imagine what they'll do to them."

Meanwhile, a naturalized Russian citizen of Azerbaijani origin who works as an entrepreneur, says he does not expect any changes to the treatment of migrants.

(SOUNDBITE) (Russian) ENTREPRENEUR OF AZERBAIJANI ORIGIN, NATURALISED RUSSIAN CITIZEN, GAFAR OVINTEGYAN, SAYING:

"We have not caused any scandal. It was all set up. Will it lead to anything good? No, nothing good will come out of it. They shout, scream at us, telling us to leave. Do you think that would change anything? Nothing would change. It would be only worse."

Many of Russia's migrants come from the heavily Muslim North Caucasus and ex-Soviet states of the Caucasus and Central Asia.