In Stockholm on Wednesday, news that three U.S. scientists will share the 2013 Nobel Prize for chemistry.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) PERMANENT SECRETARY OF THE ROYAL SWEDISH ACADEMY OF SCIENCES STAFFAN NORMARK SAYING:

"The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Professor Martin Karplus at University de Strasbourg, France and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts and Professor Michael Levitt at Stanford University School of Medicine, California, USA and Professor Arieh Warshel at University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA."

The prize was awarded to the men for essentially taking chemistry to cyber-space.

The men pioneered the use of computer models that simulate complex chemical reactions, work that revolutionized research in areas from drugs to solar energy.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) CHAIRMAN OF THE NOBEL COMMITTEE IN CHEMISTRY, PROFESSOR SVEN LIDIN, SAYING:

"The contributions from this year's laureates, Professor Martin Karplus, Professor Michael Levitt and Professor Arieh Warshel is that they have provided that secret handshake that brings theoretical chemistry together as one unit."

Through their computer models, the men developed a tool to create totally new knowledge, says chemistry Professor Kersti Hermansson.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) PROFESSOR OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY KERSTI HERMANSSON SAYING:

"With that knowledge you can solve problems, determine why things happen - for example concerning energy problems, corrosion, chemical reactions, materials, why the properties are how they are and how you could improve them to design better materials."

The Nobel prize is 8 million crowns, that's about $1.25 million US dollars.