Independent Senator, Nick Xenophon, says if a politician's entitlement claim is rejected it might be a good idea to make them pay back double.

He's arrived in Tamworth to meet Nationals' member for New England and federal Agriculture Minister, Barnaby Joyce.

The two are discussing the make-up of the new Senate and areas where legislative reform is needed, including travel expenses.

Senator Xenophon says he thinks parliamentarians need tougher guidelines clarifying what is, and is not, an acceptable expense.

"I don't think we should have business-class travel for MPs of flights of less than two hours, there needs to be a push by government to use semi-flexible fares, rather than the fully flexible fares which are much more expensive," he said.

"If there is a mix-up with an entitlement maybe there is an incentive for all of us to risk manage it better by paying back twice the amount."

Barnaby Joyce says he acknowledges and accepts the admonishment he's received over the entitlements issue.

"You never go out to plan to do the wrong thing and you claim the entitlements you believe are right and, when others bring it to your attention that that is not the case, you repay whatever it is you have to repay," he said.

"But, on the study tour issue, all that is approved before you go, they know exactly what you're up to, you tell them exactly what you're doing and that is how you get approval for it."

Senator Xenophon says he doesn't always see eye-to-eye with Barnaby Joyce on everything, but says he believes there are areas of common ground, especially when it comes to supermarket duopoly.

"Let's not forget, in the final days of the Howard government it was Barnaby Joyce who got through the Senate the about predatory pricing, which I think was a very important amendment," he said.

"It's fair to say that Barnaby Joyce 'gets it' it terms of the importance of farmers having variety in the supply chain that they just don't have now."

Senator Xenophon says there is no other country in the world where two supermarket chains control so much of the market.

"In the UK, you have something like five major companies controlling about 75 per cent of the market, compared with just two companies controlling 80 per cent here," he said.

"So, we have this incredible concentration of supermarket power which, I think, needs to be looked at and I'm really encouraged by the early steps the new [Abbott] government has made in relation to this."

The Federal Agriculture Minister, Barnaby Joyce, says securing the numbers in the Senate is the only way the Coalition's plans for the Australian economy can be successfully implemented.

"It doesn't matter what we might want as a government if we can't get things through the Senate we're not going anywhere and Nick is an absolutely crucial player in that," he said.

"I've had a strong working relationship with Nick and I respect his views and generally I go to Adelaide and this is the first time Nick has been to Tamworth and I want to chip him on that, because he should have been here before."

Barnaby Joyce says he and Senator Xenophon have been able to put differences aside in the past to ensure the passage of important legislation and they will do so again.

He says it's important for New England voters to watch their representative getting on with business.

"What I hope is also good for the electorate is people are seeing the flow of people through the Tamworth office as we try to do a large section of our work here in Tamworth and try to make sure the New England remains a centre for agricultural policy."