Asylum seekers who live in the community and are charged with a crime are having their visas cancelled or being returned to immigration detention centres.

Immigration Minister Scott Morrison said the crackdown came after a rise in the number of serious offences allegedly committed by asylum seekers on bridging visas or in community detention.

"Warnings from the coalition about risks to the community and the need for tighter controls were not only ignored, they were mocked," the minister said on Monday.

The federal government has revoked 14 bridging visas due to criminal charges, including 10 cancellations since the federal election, Mr Morrison said on Monday.

There are more than 21,300 people in Australia on bridging visas.

Another 14 people have had their community detention arrangements revoked because of criminal charges.

At the end of August, there were 2739 people in community detention, which is different to immigration detention.

Community detention involves reporting regularly to officials, living at a designated address and not doing any paid work.

The charges laid against the 28 people include assault, acts of indecency, stalking, indecent assault on a minor, people smuggling, rape and drink driving.

The government was also providing police with the addresses of asylum seekers in community detention and developing mandatory behavioural protocols.

"Setting some clear standards and taking strong action to revoke the privileges of those who violate those standards is an important early step in restoring integrity to the bridging visa and community detention programs," he said in a statement.

"While there is no suggestion that the incidence of charges is disproportionate for illegal boat arrivals released into the community, I have a zero tolerance attitude for those who violate the trust given by granting them permission to live in the community."