By Steve Keating

PARK CITY, Utah (Reuters) - While some athletes danced around Russia's anti-gay legislation on Monday American skiing great Bode Miller met the issue head on by calling next year's Sochi Winter Olympic hosts "ignorant."

Speaking at the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) media summit, the outspoken Miller was very clear on his view of a controversial Russian law which bans the spread of homosexual propaganda among minors.

"It is absolutely embarrassing that there are countries and people who are that intolerant, that ignorant, said Miller, who will be bidding for a place on his fifth U. S. Olympic team.

"But it's not the first time we've been dealing with human rights issues since there were humans."

Critics say the law bars all gay rights rallies and could be used to prosecute anyone voicing support for homosexuals while supporters say it will help protect children.

Earlier, six members of the U. S. figure skating team were also asked their thoughts on the law that has drawn worldwide condemnation and cast a shadow over the build-up to the February 7-23 Winter Games.

All of the figure skaters, with the exception of U. S. women's champion Ashley Wagner, danced around the delicate issue saying they were only athletes and leaving it up to the USOC and International Olympic Committee (IOC) to establish a position.

Miller, however, has seldom let anyone else speak for him and has never shied away from controversy during a skiing career that has made him one of the sport's most popular and successful athletes.

The five-time Olympic medallist, who once broke away from the U. S. ski federation to form his own team, also had a shot for the USOC and the IOC for not standing up for the values of tolerance and openness they preach in their charters.

"I think it's crappy that we don't have a better system dealing with that stuff," said Miller. "Asking an athlete to go somewhere and compete and be a representative of a philosophy and all the crap that goes along with it and then tell them they can't express their views or say what they believe I think is pretty hypocritical.

"If they let me make the rules I will switch it for you immediately, I can solve a lot of stuff really quickly but unfortunately no one has elected me or given me that kind of power.

"My main emotion when I hear about stuff like that is embarrassment. As a human being I think it is embarrassing."

(Editing by Frank Pingue)

About News.net

Publishing Services International Limited (PSIL) is the publisher and operator of a worldwide network of online news sites dedicated to delivering fair, accurate and relevant reporting from a variety of the world’s most trusted sources – from the biggest cities to the smallest towns.

We deliver positive and powerful messages to our readers, providing up‑to‑the‑second news that matters to the individual.

Our promise is to serve communities and individuals worldwide, delivering information that hasn’t always been available to them. We will give them back a voice – a voice that’s empowering because it is theirs – and provide a platform to communicate between themselves and the world.

We believe people are not just generic demographics; they are individuals with their own preferences and curiosities. We are about understanding these individuals, listening to them, and serving them.

We are the new pioneering spirit of news – we’re not talking to everyone, we’re talking with every one.

If you want your news, your voice, your way, on your time – we’ve got news for you.

 

FAQs

Email

If you have any questions or concerns please email us on support@news.net

Phone

  • Australia, Toll Free 1-800-983-421
  • Hong Kong, Toll Free 800-906-187
  • Singapore, Toll Free 800-852-3871
  • USA/Canada, Toll Free 1-800-830-4132

Advertise With Us

Interested in being awesome?
Contact us by email or phone.

Cancel