Like any good house guest, Tony Abbott was very sorry for imposing.

He stopped by the Schmusch household in Adelaide's Kidman Park for a morning coffee and a biscuit on Tuesday, bringing his travelling media scrum with him.

"It's impossible to do anything too much in an election campaign without having a little squadron of media with you," the opposition leader told Erich Schmusch, as they sat down at an outdoor table to talk about cost of living pressures.

"I guess it's unavoidable, it's part of democracy."

Mr Abbott chatted to the family of five and their neighbours, the Careys, about his plans to scrap the carbon and mining taxes, his signature paid parental leave scheme, and how much cheaper life would be under a coalition government.

"It's something this government needs to do," Mr Schmusch told the man likely to be prime minister after Saturday.

"I'm just happy to hear it come from you."

People expect to be able to rely on their leaders, Mr Abbott said.

"Sure this election is a referendum on the carbon tax, but it is also a referendum on political parties which don't tell the truth."

After a 10-minute chat, the media were ordered out of the house, giving Mr Abbott, Liberal frontbencher Christopher Pyne and Hindmarsh candidate Matt Williams a few minutes alone with the families.

Mr Abbott was then whisked away in his Comcar to the next campaign event, leaving Mr Pyne to make his own way.

Hopping into his old Ford ute with PYNE WORKS FOR YOU painted on the bonnet, the coalition's education spokesman was asked by a photographer to wind down his window.

"That's what I always do," he said - the Pynemobile doesn't have air conditioning.