Hundreds of industry representatives have gathered for the second Destination Q forum on Queensland's Gold Coast, which will focus on developing a 20-year tourism plan for the state.

Gold Coast Tourism chief executive officer Martin Winter says the Gold Coast is critical to the state's future.

"We account for more than 27 per cent of all of the tourist activity in the state and so it's very important that we do well," he said.

"If the Gold Coast thrives, so does Queensland.

"We're expecting that at the end of this Destination Q there'll be a whole lot of new objections.

"For the forthcoming months, we'll be working to make sure the Gold Coast stays high on the agenda."

The Queensland Tourism Industry Council (QTIC) says it is happy with the progress made in reforming the sector over the past 12 months.

QTIC chief executive officer Daniel Gschwind says there have been significant changes to liquor legislation, planning schemes, reducing red tape and growing ecotourism.

He says government and industry representatives will discuss how to build on the good work at the Destination Q forum.

"Looking after our significant natural assets and using them sustainably for tourism," he said.

"It's about how do we form sustainable partnerships between industry and government to fund the activities that we need to undertake.

"It's about how do we market ourselves to the most fruitful markets, how do we gather the intelligence."

Mr Gschwind says a lot has been achieved in the past year but Queensland has to keep innovating.

"If we continue to doing the same thing we have in the past we will only see marginal change at best," he said.

"If we want to achieve those aspirational targets that we have set, then we will need radical change in collaboration, radical change in service and quality standards, and radical changes in making us more competitive in both international and domestic markets."

The chief executive officer of Tourism Tropical North Queensland, Rob Giason, says he is generally happy with how the State Government is engaging with the sector.

"We're very keen to work with the national parks portfolio because we have such rich assets that obviously are a drawcard for our visitors," he said.

"Being able to provide novel and unique experiences into some of the wilderness areas is certainly something we would like to discuss and obviously bring forward as a real opportunity."

Meanwhile, Whitsunday Mayor Jenny Whitney says she will use the forum to highlight investment opportunities in the north Queensland region.

Councillor Whitney says she also wants to discuss plans to increase the number of flights to Proserpine, north of Mackay.

"In order to attract that investment and create more opportunities is the need for easy access with direct flights," she said.

"The ability to expand the aviation market through the Whitsunday Coast airport and we see that as an advantage for tourism as well.

"What we certainly do do is fly the flag to let government know at every opportunity that the Whitsunday region has the four pillar approach to economic development

"We're trying to attract as much investment [as possible] and create jobs.

"We've got the liveability, we've got the tourism destination."

The chief executive officer of Tourism Tropical North Queensland, Rob Giason, says the forum will discuss how to make the industry more efficient.

"One of the challenging debates that we need to have is how do we better equip the industry so it is in fact even more self-sufficient," he said.

"It represents small business, it represents a whole range of different businesses in different clusters.

"We have the restaurant industry, we have the accommodation sector, we have the transport sector.

"We're not necessarily regarded as one industry."