Besieged Essendon coach James Hird has engaged high profile lawyer Julian Burnside QC to represent him as the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority continues to investigate the club's supplements program.

ASADA is expected to release its findings on the Bombers next week, including allegations about what Hird knew about the substances being administered.

Hird has continually denied any wrong doing by himself or anyone at the club.

Burnside confirmed this morning that he is acting for Hird but said he could not comment on reports that they may seek an injunction to stop the ASADA report being made public.

This week former Essendon high performance manager Dean Robinson accused Hird of being at the centre of the club's supplements program.

In an hour long Channel Seven interview on Wednesday Robinson made several allegations regarding Hird's involvement including saying he had sought out an undetectable testosterone cream.

Hird and Essendon have denied all allegations.

On Thursday Hird said he had never spoken to the New York doctor Robinson referred to.

The club in a statement said Hird always emphasised that the 2012 supplements program had to be within WADA and AFL guidelines.

Essendon chairman Paul Little said Robinson's interview was a personal attack on Hird without foundation.

"What went to air - largely unchallenged by Channel 7 - was a series of uncorroborated allegations by a disgruntled, disaffected and discredited ex-employee," Little said in a statement .

"The inaccuracies in the interview are too many to work through one-by-one, and we are seeking legal advice on a number of these matters."

Little said he spoke to Hird and could refute several of the accusations made by Robinson including that police never raided Hird's house and Hird did not speak to Robinson about an undetectable cream.