PTV - NO ACCESS PAKISTAN

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide of US Secretary of State John Kerry talking to reporter

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) John Kerry, US Secretary of State:

"Well President Obama is very, very sensitive and very concerned about any kind of reaction to any kind of counter-terrorism activities, whatever they may be, and the president has spoken very directly, very transparently, and very accountably to all of our efforts. We want to work with the government of Pakistan, not against it. This is a programme, in many parts of the world, where the president has really narrowed whatever it might be doing, to live up to the highest standards with respect to any kind of counter-terrorism activities, and I believe that we are on a good track. I think the programme will end as we have eliminated most of the threat and continue to eliminate."

3. Reporter question UPSOUND: (English) "And there is no timeline that you envisage for ending this strike?"

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) John Kerry, US Secretary of State:

"I think the president has a very real timeline, and we hope it's going to be very very soon."

STORYLINE

US Secretary of State John Kerry has said that US drone strikes on Pakistan could end soon.

Kerry's remark to Pakistani broadcaster PTV on Thursday was the first official confirmation that the Obama administration wants to end the program.

"I think the program will end as we have eliminated most of the threat and continue to eliminate," Kerry said.

However, when asked he would not be drawn on a time scale for when the Central Intelligence Agency-led operation would be halted, saying only that he hoped it would be "very very soon".

Pakistani officials and the public have been angry about US drone strikes against suspected militants in Pakistan, claiming they violate their sovereignty.

They have used Kerry's visit to press the US to stop the drone attacks.

Kerry announced the resumption of talks between the two countries during his first visit to Pakistan as Secretary of State.

He said the US does not want bilateral relations defined solely by hot-button security issues like counter-terrorism and the war in Afghanistan.