Disgraced former NSW Labor minister Eddie Obeid says he's the victim of a "political witch hunt" and looks forward to fighting possible charges in court.

The Independent Commission Against Corruption on Wednesday recommended charges be laid against Mr Obeid, former resources minister Ian Macdonald and several businessmen over their involvement in the Mount Penny coal mine.

But a defiant Mr Obeid says the ICAC inquiry was a "sham".

"The conclusion was expected from the opening statement," he told reporters on Thursday.

The process, he added, was "nothing short of a political witch hunt".

He also took a swipe at NSW Labor leader John Robertson and NSW Labor secretary Sam Dastyari for hanging him out to dry, saying they weren't "proper Labor leaders".

"These people wore out the carpet in my office when they wanted something," he told reporters.

"I can't believe these people who I mentored, I got them their jobs, they don't give me the benefit that every other Australian has - innocent until proven guilty."

Mr Obeid said he hopes the DPP accepts ICAC's recommendation and pursues charges in the Supreme Court.

"That's the only way we will be able to bring on the evidence and the truth of what's behind this."

"If (Premier Barry) O'Farrell has got the guts and wants the truth he'll support the DPP and give them more funds and more staff to look at this issue quickly and take it to court."

Mr Macdonald, the man dubbed "Eddie Obeid's left testicle" during the ICAC hearings, was defended by his former ministerial colleague.

"(He's a) professional person and a good politician," Mr Obeid said.

The inquiry had affected his family "very badly", Mr Obeid said.

But he believes he and his son Moses will be vindicated if the matter is taken to court.

There is "nothing in this that finds a smoking gun against anyone," Mr Obeid said of the ICAC report.

"I am not corrupt and I will prove that in a court of law."

 

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