DURATION: 0:59

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SHOTLIST:

AP HORIZONS -- AP CLIENTS ONLY

Tsukuba City, Japan -- July 23, 2013

1. Tilt up, women riding winglets

2. Back shot, women riding winglets

3. Women riding winglets toward camera

4. Tilt down, man riding winglet

5. Tilt up, man riding winglet

6. Low shot, wheels of winglet

7. Wide, people riding winglets past camera

8. Tilt up, women riding winglets

9. Tilt down, woman on winglet

10. Wide shot, people on winglets in crosswalk

11. UPSOUND: Kenichi Ichihara, Mayor of Tsukuba City

12. People riding winglets out of elevator

13. UPSOUND: Akifumi Tamaoki, General Manager of Partner Robot Division, Toyota Motor Corporation

14. People riding winglets out of elevator

15. Tilt down, women riding winglets

16, Wide, people riding side-by-side on winglets

VOICE-OVER SCRIPT:

TALK ABOUT FLYING AWAY ON A WING AND A PRAYER. WELL, REALLY, A WINGLET. THAT'S THE NAME OF A NEW MOBILITY DEVICE BEING TESTED IN JAPAN.

IT'S MADE BY TOYOTA, WHICH CLASSIFIES THE SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM AS A ROBOT.

THE WINGLET IS SIMILAR TO A SEGWAY, BUT AT 44 POUNDS, IT WEIGHS LESS THAN HALF. AND IT HAS A SMALLER PROFILE.

DON'T EXPECT TO ZOOM DOWN THE STREET ON A WINGLET. THE TOP SPEED IS ABOUT FOUR MILES AN HOUR AND THE MAXIMUM RANGE IS TWO-AND-A-HALF MILES.

BUT THAT MAKES IT WELL SUITED TO THE CROWDED STREETS OF TOKYO AND OTHER JAPANESE CITIES.

(NATS IN JAPANESE)

THE LOCAL MAYOR SAYS IT'S SAFE AND EXTREMELY FUN TO RIDE.

THE DESIGNERS SAY THEY'RE SMALL ENOUGH THAT THREE PEOPLE CAN RIDE THEM INTO AN ELEVATOR.

(NATS IN JAPANESE)

THE HEAD OF THE DIVISION THAT DESIGNED THE WINGLET SAYS IT WILL TAKE TIME FOR THE PUBLIC TO ACCEPT THE DEVICES INDOORS.

AND THAT MEANS DON'T EXPECT TO BUY ONE ANYTIME SOON--SAFETY TESTING WILL LAST UNTIL 2016.

MATT FRIEDMAN. ASSOCIATED PRESS.

 

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