The Queensland Government says it does not receive enough federal funding to treat patients coming from Papua New Guinea (PNG) to the Torres Strait for diseases like tuberculosis and the problem could be compounded by plans to resettle asylum seekers there.

The Government is predicting there could be a "wave" of asylum seekers coming to Australia following the Federal Government's deal with PNG.

But the Federal Government says the claim is hysterical.

Queensland Health Minister Lawrence Springborg says a new funding agreement with the Commonwealth will leave an $8 million shortfall this year.

He has told a budget estimates hearing that six asylum seekers have been treated by health authorities in the Torres Strait in the last six months.

Mr Springborg says others could be using the same route.

"It's a canoe ride, and then it's two air tickets and a taxi ride to western Sydney," he said.

Queensland Opposition spokeswoman Jo-Ann Miller questioned the relevance to the state budget.

"Where is immigration a part of the health portfolio estimates?" she said.

Mr Springborg says one of the asylum seekers recently treated in Queensland included a Syrian man with suspected tuberculosis (TB).

"If we can't keep our borders secure against people from Papua New Guinea, then how can we keep illegal people smugglers from using that as a very, very easy conduit to the Australian mainland?" he said.

"We would never have known about this Syrian - who had made his way from Syria into Indonesia into Papua New Guinea likely - then a canoe ride down through the islands, if he hadn't been detected and actually brought to our facility.

"How many of these people have been actually been caught in there and taken elsewhere that we don't know about."

The estimates hearing was told the Syrian man was released from hospital back into the custody of the Immigration Department officials.

The Torres Strait Island Regional Council has been refusing entry to PNG Nationals from 13 treaty villages, after the death of a local elder from TB.