A frustrated Mark Webber admits a botched pitstop cost him a potential podium finish at Sunday's Grand Prix.

But the Australian Formula One driver is thankful his subsequent flying tyre didn't also cost the life of a nearby cameraman.

World champions Red Bull were fined 30,000 euro ($A42,811) for an unsafe pit release on lap nine, when Webber's right-rear wheel spun off and bounced past four garages into cameraman Paul Allen's back.

Allen was treated on-site before being airlifted to nearby Koblenz Hospital.

He is understood to have broken his collarbone and ribs.

"I hope the guy's okay ... and I very much hope there's no serious damage done," the retiring pilot said.

Webber was running second at the time to teammate Sebastian Vettel, who went on to win his first Grand Prix on home soil.

It took two-and-a-half minutes before he rejoined the race at the back of the field.

But the 36-year-old fought back to finish in seventh spot, helped by a Safety Car 24 laps into the 60-lap race when Jules Bianchi's burnt-out Marussia rolled backwards down the track without a driver.

Regardless, Webber was left disappointed - especially after a rare flying start from third on the grid.

"It was a case of coulda woulda shoulda," he said.

"A very good result might have been possible today without that incident in the pits.

"I think I could have challenged for the win.

"It would have been tough because Seb had to work hard to stay ahead of the Lotuses, but I would have been up there.

"When you know you have the pace, it makes a result like today all the more frustrating."

Webber will have a three-week break before the next race - his 10th last before retiring from Formula One - in Hungary.

 

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