The weather may have been icy, but the reception was warm for Prime Minister Kevin Rudd on his first outing in Sydney's west since retaking the top job.

Mr Rudd hit the main shopping strip of Springwood, in the Blue Mountains, on Saturday morning, posing for photos and chatting to locals who turned out to see him despite driving rain and biting cold.

In a whirlwind excursion through the mountain village Mr Rudd visited a cafe, the local pub, a bakery and a bookstore, before stopping for a chat in Mandarin with a local small business owner.

So many people wanted snaps with Mr Rudd that it took him an hour just to walk the hamlet's main shopping avenue on Macquarie Road.

One Springwood resident who scored a pic with the PM was 27-year-old Miyoko.

"Forget Kevin '07, it's Kevin '13," she told AAP. "I'm very happy he's back."

James Tulip, 79, also braved the inclement weather to get a glimpse of Mr Rudd.

"He's got the opposition on the back foot immediately," said Mr Tulip, who lives in nearby Woodfood.

"He's also certainly brought a dramatic edge back into Australian politics ... I do hope his personality is more diplomatic this time."

One man issued a blunter assessment of Mr Rudd from the driver's side of a red Holden Commodore.

"Rudd you're still the world's biggest wanker," he shouted in the PM's direction as he drove down the street.

Springwood sits in the federal seat of Macquarie, held by the Coalition's Louise Markus since 2010 on a 1.3 per cent margin.

It takes in mountain towns such as Katoomba, Blaxland, Wentworth Falls, Lawson, Richmond, Windsor and Kurrajong.

The ALP's candidate in the seat is Susan Templeman, a former radio journalist and business owner.

The importance of Sydney's west was not lost on Mr Rudd.

"Half as many people live here as live in the whole of Queensland, there are four million people in Queensland (and) there are two million people here," he told reporters.

"When I think about western Sydney I see it as a huge set of communities ... that have their own particular needs which no government can overlook.

"This is really important."