Some of Australia's most advanced water engineers have arrived at Brisbane's Wesley Hospital as it tries to contain an outbreak of legionnaires' disease that has killed one patient.

UnitingCare Health executive director Richard Royle said the Victorian specialists would work with hospital engineers to inject cleaning fluid into the water systems.

"The cleaning solution will dissolve bio-film, which is a build up of plaque-like material inside the pipes," he said in a statement.

"The Victorian engineers are among the most experienced in Australia in dealing with legionella so this level of expertise will help us to return to normal services as soon as possible."

Patients from the hospital's east wing are being moved as pipes are cleaned and tested, but the results won't be known until June 17.

Legionella bacteria was found in taps in a room where a cancer patient contracted the disease and died more than a week ago.

A second patient from a different hospital wing also contacted the disease and remains in intensive care.

For the past six days, the hospital has suspended surgeries, put its emergency centre on bypass and refused new admissions.

The hospital was expected to reopen this Wednesday but officials now predict it could be closed for another week or more.

It has reduced its occupancy rate from 500 to 220 as day-patient services remain for oncology, dialysis and medical imaging.

"Our patient numbers will continue to decrease this week as more patients are discharged," Mr Royle said.

The hospital's independent panel is meeting on Tuesday.