BEYOND THE BEEPS AND WHIRS OF A NEWBORN'S HOSPITAL ROOM... FLOATS A QUIET SONG.

GENTLE GUITAR STRUMMING AND SOFT SINGING SOOTHE A BABY WHO ARRIVED ALL TOO SOON.

(SOT)

(SUPER = Lucy Morales, Mother of preemie)

"The music relaxes him, it makes him feel more calm."

(SOT)

(SUPER = Elizabeth Klinger, Music therapist, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital)

"A lot of times, families become afraid of interacting with their children because they are so sick and so frail, and music provides them with something that they can still do."

(SUPER = Chicago)

ELIZABETH KLINGER IS A MUSIC THERAPIST AT LURIE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL IN CHICAGO.

IT'S ONE OF ABOUT TWO DOZEN U-S HOSPITALS THAT NOW OFFERS MUSIC THERAPY IN THEIR NEWBORN INTENSIVE CARE UNITS.

STUDIES SUGGEST THE VIBRATIONS AND RHYTHMS OF LIVE MUSIC RELIEVE STRESS IN PREEMIES STRUGGLING TO DEVELOP.

(SOT)

(SUPER = Dr. Natalia Henner, Neonatologist, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital)

"It does help with promoting growth and there is some good literature, in the nursing literature saying that the time to discharge is a little bit shorter in babies who have been exposed to more music therapy."

THE MUSIC ALSO HELPS DRAW PARENTS AND THEIR BABIES CLOSER TOGETHER.

LUCY MORALES SAYS THE SWEET SOUNDS HELP HER SON.

(SOT)

(SUPER = Lucy Morales, Mother of preemie)

"While he's listening to the music he stays asleep."

THE MUSIC HELPS HER TOO.

(SOT)

(SUPER = Lucy Morales, Mother of preemie)

"The first time me and dad heard her sing to him it was really nice because dad cried, so, it got to me."

MUSIC THERAPY...MORE THAN JUST A LULLABY FOR BABIES.

LEE POWELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS.

 

Advertisement