SHOT LIST

AP Entertainment

West Hollywood, California, 24 April 2013

1. SOUNDBITE (English) will.i.am/Recording artist, on his grandmother Sarah Ann Cain: "So we're from the projects -- East LA. On welfare the majority of our lives. A lot of my friends are dead and in prison. Just like any urban person that comes from areas like I'm from. But my grandma was super grandma. To where ain't nobody mess with our family in my neighborhood because everybody loved my grandma. She was the one that prayed for everybody, our next-door neighbors. Lived in the church, and raised my mom and my uncles to be the people that they are today."

2. SOUNDBITE (English) will.i.am/Recording artist, on his grandmother Sarah Ann Cain: "So that all came from this little special old lady who was a single mom who had eight kids. And did it all by herself, and taught my mom how to do it all by herself. And at the time there was racism in America, segregation in America. And here was this little old lady that did incredible things."

3. SOUNDBITE (English) will.i.am/Recording artist, on his grandmother Sarah Ann Cain: "She's from Picayune, Mississippi and came to -- it's a beautiful story. It's long. She had been in the projects right when the projects was started. So we were one of the first families in the projects. And I moved them out. Music allowed me, helped me move my family out of the projects."

4. SOUNDBITE (English) will.i.am/Recording artist, on his grandmother Sarah Ann Cain: "I took her to every Grammy. Every time we went to the Grammys she was my date. Didn't take no girl. Didn't take no -- I took my grandma. She was proud. She wore her little suit with her little big old hat. She would go to church. Everybody would be like, 'I saw you with your grandson on the Grammys. You must be so proud.' That's my grandma."

5. SOUNDBITE (English) will.i.am/Recording artist, on his grandmother Sarah Ann Cain: "And if you think about it, my grandma was probably born in the 20s. That means her mom was born in like the late 1800s. And her grandma -- my grandma's grandma -- was probably a slave. That's not that far. So she raised me to the point where 'Wow! I'm at the inauguration, performing for the first African-American president. Damn, my grandma is ...' If there was anybody who sculpted me, who molded me -- my mind, my perspective, my heart -- my grandma. I'm performing at the Queen's Jubilee. My grandma! Every step of the way, my grandma has been there. You know? People say, call me bad words? Don't respond. Just ignore. Stay on course on what it is you want to accomplish. Just make sure you don't do wrong by nobody. That's my grandma. So I dedicate this record, this whole concept of 'willpower,' to my grandma. Because she's not here anymore. But she's still here."

6. Close zoom to wide will.i.am poses for photographer in music studio

7. Wide will.i.am poses for photographer

Interscope

8. Music video excerpt: "#thatPOWER" by will.i.am featuring Justin Bieber

WILL.I.AM REFLECTS ON GRANDMOTHER'S INFLUENCE

Will.i.am got it from his grandma.

The rapper-producer-singer dedicated his new album "#willpower" to his grandmother Sarah Ann Cain, who died last Thanksgiving. He said she influenced his life more than anyone else.

"So we're from the projects -- East LA. On welfare the majority of our lives. A lot of my friends are dead and in prison," said the rapper, whose real name is William Adams. "But my grandma was super grandma. To where ain't nobody mess with our family in my neighborhood because everybody loved my grandma. She was the one that prayed for everybody, our next-door neighbors. Lived in the church, and raised my mom and my uncles to be the people that they are today."

Will.i.am said his grandmother was among the first familities in the East Los Angeles projects after moving from Mississippi. She had eight children, including two who went on to become professional athletes.

"And did it all by herself, and taught my mom how to do it all by herself. And at the time there was racism in America, segregation in America. And here was this little old lady that did incredible things," he said.

When will.i.am made enough money with his group the Black Eyed Peas, he was able to move his grandmother and mother out of the neighborhood he grew up in. Since then, his grandmother was his regular date at awards shows.

"Every time we went to the Grammys she was my date. Didn't take no girl," he said. "She was proud. She wore her little suit with her little big old hat. She would go to church. Everybody would be like, 'I saw you with your grandson on the Grammys. You must be so proud.' That's my grandma."

He said he reflects on his family history when marking accomplishments like playing at Barack Obama's inauguration or the Queen's Jubilee in London.

"My grandma was probably born in the 20s. That means her mom was born in like the late 1800s. And her grandma -- my grandma's grandma -- was probably a slave. That's not that far. So she raised me to the point where 'Wow! I'm at the inauguration, performing for the first African-American president. Damn, my grandma is ...' If there was anybody who sculpted me, who molded me -- my mind, my perspective, my heart -- my grandma.

"Because she's not here anymore. But she's still here," he said.