SHOT LIST

AP Entertainment

Los Angeles, 18 April 2013

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Nancy Wilson/Recording artist (Heart), on comforting power of music: "Music is definitely a force to be reckoned with. It's sort of bigger than all of us put together. I mean, it's something that is so healing at times. You can turn to it like a best friend, like a confidant, or a partner, and get strength and even energy. If you're trying to work out, you put your music on -- suddenly I can work out better. There's something completely magic going on with music."

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Randy Newman/Recording artist, on comforting power of music: "Exactly. It's always been work to me. I've never consciously found solace in it. The best times that I have are when I'm conducting an orchestra up in the stand with the musicians and sometimes when I'm playing on-stage. But I never as a kid went to music for solace. I'd look at baseball statistics or I'd play ball or something -- shoot baskets. But it was never like -- I'd rather listen to someone talking, talk radio. I was always working when I did music somehow. But maybe more so now I'll listen to music and I'll like it better. I don't know. I'm getting senile or something. Of course the writing of it has been enormously -- it's been my life. It's everything. It's enormously important to me that I can still do it relatively well."

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Hank Shocklee/Recording artist (Public Enemy), on comforting power of music: "I mean music is life and life is music. It's just a testament to what music can do and the power of music. I mean, music shaped my entire being, my entire life. Everything from blues to jazz to rock and roll to heavy metal to hip-hop to R&B. I mean what can you say about it? It's the greatest thing -- it's the greatest gift that we have on this planet."

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Ann Wilson/Recording artist (Heart), on comforting power of music: "People forget that sound is a physical thing. And soundwaves actually hit you. And so music massages your body, your mind-body constantly. And then you add some really good lyrics and some poetry to it, you have a damn fine sensation. It's pleasure. It's pure pleasure."

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Ann Wilson/Recording artist (Heart), on comforting power of music:

"Singing of course is a physical act of transcendence. Whoo - but it is. But when I was younger, like the hard years of junior high school, middle school and all that, the worst years of your life -- there's some song that you think is your life. The person is talking to you. And it's very confidential. It's like that person singing is your confidant. They're going 'Oh, it's OK.' That's so good. It's worth the trip to do it and to listen to it, to pay attention."

(Reporter: "Do you remember what that was for you?")

Wilson: "Of course it was the Beatles when I was 13. The Rolling Stones of course back then."

Nancy Wilson/Recording artist (Heart): "Elton John and Simon and Garfunkel, and Joni Mitchell and Jackson Browne and Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young."

6. Medium Ann and Nancy Wilson on arrivals line

7. Wide Ann and Nancy Wilson talk with reporter

8. Medium tilt down Nancy Wilson talks with reporter

9. Wide Ann and Nancy Wilson talk with reporter

10. Wide Randy Newman talks with reporter

11. Cutaway camera operators

12. Medium Randy Newman talks with reporter

13. Wide Public Enemy on arrivals line

14. Medium Public Enemy on arrivals line with Hank Shocklee

ROCK HALL INDUCTEES ON MUSIC'S COMFORTING POWER

Music has the power to comfort in times of trouble.

That was the message from Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees as they accepted their honors on a turbulent week in the US including the Boston Marathon bombing and a massive explosion in Texas.

"Music is definitely a force to be reckoned with. It's sort of bigger than all of us put together. I mean, it's something that is so healing at times," said Nancy Wilson of Heart. "You can turn to it like a best friend, like a confidant, or a partner, and get strength and even energy. If you're trying to work out, you put your music on -- suddenly I can work out better. There's something completely magic going on with music."

Los Angeles native Randy Newman said he viewed music as work -- and didn't turn to it for solace at least as a youngster.

"The best times that I have are when I'm conducting an orchestra up in the stand with the musicians and sometimes when I'm playing on-stage. But I never as a kid went to music for solace. I'd look at baseball statistics or I'd play ball or something -- shoot baskets," Newman said. "But maybe more so now I'll listen to music and I'll like it better. I don't know. I'm getting senile or something. Of course the writing of it has been enormously -- it's been my life. It's everything. It's enormously important to me that I can still do it relatively well."

Hank Shocklee, producer behind Public Enemy, said the power of music in his life -- for healing and otherwise -- can't be overstated.

"I mean music is life and life is music. It's just a testament to what music can do and the power of music," he said. "I mean, music shaped my entire being, my entire life. ... it's the greatest gift that we have on this planet."

Heart singer Ann Wilson noted the physicality of music, saying: "People forget that sound is a physical thing. And soundwaves actually hit you. And so music massages your body, your mind-body constantly. And then you add some really good lyrics and some poetry to it, you have a damn fine sensation. It's pleasure. It's pure pleasure."

She said the Beatles became her solace in the turbulent time of middle and high school years.

"It's like that person singing is your confidant. They're going 'Oh, it's OK.' That's so good. It's worth the trip to do it and to listen to it, to pay attention," she said.

 

Advertisement