Foreign Minister Bob Carr must reveal his response to an Israeli court document blaming the country's prison service for the death of Melbourne man and suspected spy Ben Zygier, the Australian Greens say.

Zygier was found hanged in his supposedly suicide-proof cell in Israel's Ayalon Prison in December 2010.

Also known as Prisoner X, the dual Australian-Israeli was arrested 11 months earlier for alleged serious national security offences. Details remain scant but it is believed he worked for Israeli spy agency Mossad.

New court documents released this week following a petition by the Israeli media sheds some light on Zygier's imprisonment and death.

Written by a judge shortly after his death, the report reveals Zygier was known to be suicidal, had an emotionally charged exchange with his wife the day he was found hanged and that his cell was not properly watched by prison guards.

But the report sheds no light on Zygier's arrest, his alleged crimes or his trial.

Greens Leader Christine Milne wants to know how the Australian government is responding to the findings.

"Bob Carr needs to come clean on when he received that report and what action he took in the light of revelations that negligence was found in the prison system," she said in a statement.

"The report found negligence in the prison and yet no one will be charged - Bob Carr needs to explain what action he took with the Israeli government, what concerns he raised about the negligence of the prison guards, and provide answers on why Ben Zygier was not given extra care to alleviate his distressed state."

The report says during his time in Ayalon, Zygier was seen 57 times by social workers who found him to be suffering anxiety and suicidal tendencies.

Although Zygier's cell was supposed to be under constant surveillance, including in the bathroom area where he eventually hanged himself, a faulty bulb meant the area was in near total darkness when he took his own life.

The report also found the guardroom was not manned at the time of his death, with no one watching the surveillance cameras, some of which were faulty.

Despite the findings, the state attorney's office in Israel said it would not be pressing charges against any prison staff.