Tropical savanna landscapes, rainforests and sand dunes on Queensland's Cape York are so pristine they meet standards for a World Heritage listing, scientists have found.

In a report to the federal government, an independent panel of scientists found seven attributes of the Cape which each meet at least one criteria for a heritage listing.

"Cape York Peninsula exhibits outstanding natural integrity in a global, regional and continental scale," the report said.

"This is one of the key overarching qualities that define the character of the entire region and links the focal attributes."

However, it will be up to local indigenous people to decide whether to nominate the Cape for World Heritage listing.

Some traditional owners, such as those who live near the ancient Quinkan Rock Art, want the heritage listing to go ahead, while others say it will restrict mining opportunities in the region.

It is expected that groups will make a decision by July.

Federal Environment Minister Tony Burke said any World Heritage nomination for the Cape would only be put forward with the consent of traditional owners.

"It's the right decision to put traditional owners at the centre of the process but that means the timelines belong to them not to me."

The Newman government doesn't want the Cape to be listed as a World Heritage area, Deputy Premier Jeff Seeney told AAP on Tuesday.

"We believe the Queensland legislation adequately protects the environmental values of the Cape," he said.

It was announced this week that five firms had been shortlisted to develop a bauxite mine near the Cape York indigenous community of Aurukun.

Wilderness Society spokesman Gavan McFadzean said the report sent a clear message to the state government not to approve mining developments on the Cape.