SHOTLIST:

AP TELEVISION NEWS - AP CLIENTS ONLY

New York - March 29, 2013

1.Close, red snapper

2. Wide, fishmonger weighing red snapper

3. Close, Fulton Fish Market sign

4. SOUNDBITE (English): Peter Panteleakis, restaurant owner:

"And the fish nice and bright. The stomach it has to be not soft. Gotta be nice and firm. This is nice and fresh fish."

5. Wide, Fulton Fish Market

6. Close, fish on ice

7. Wide, market

8. SOUNDBITE (English): Roberto Nunez, fish buyer:

"That's my job. To make sure that what I bring to the market, to the restaurants today is top quality."

9. Close, box of red snapper

10. Close, list of fish to buy

11. Close, looking at a box of fish with a fish hook

12. SOUNDBITE (English): Roberto Nunez, fish buyer:

"I have to identify through my fish orders what are the items that are hot at the moment. And pretty much right away to get them."

13. Close, point of view shot looking at a box of fish on ice

14. Wide, Nunez walking through the market

15. Close, looking through a box of Monktails

16. SOUNDBITE (English): Roberto Nunez, fish buyer:

"There's so many challenges in this business. First of all you have the weather. Which is pretty ah very key on what you are going to get tonight or tomorrow."

17. Wide, fishmonger weighing very large fish

18. Close, unpacking a very large fish covered in ice

19. Close, a box of fish

20. Close, a box of red snapper

21. SOUNDBITE (English): Peter Panteleakis, restaurant owner:

"My father, as I told you before is past away a long time ago. He took me to the market in 1967 in the other market, and he teach me all the how they look the fish. How they talk to you. The fish. If they fresh."

22. Wide, Panteleakis looking at a box of black sea bass

23. Wide, Panteleakis and his son walking in the market

24. Close, fishmonger holding a large fileted fish

25. Close, Panteleakis shaking a box of black sea bass packed in ice

26. SOUNDBITE (English): Nikos Panteleakis, third-generation fish buyer:

"My father and I have been coming here a very, very long time. I grew up here in the fish market."

27. Wide, Panteleakis and his son greeting fishmongers

28. Wide, market

29. Close, forklifts driving around the market

STORYLINE:

The Fulton Fish Market, locate in New York's South Bronx, is the world's second largest after Tokyo.

Located in a 450,000-square-foot warehouse, this refrigerated building is the size of six football fields.

Visitors flock to the market in the middle of the night, dodging small forklifts that scuttle around the wet floor moving seafood-stuffed cardboard boxes.

And for Fish buyer's hoping to score the best quality seafood for the best price - negotiations happen in seconds.

Roberto Nunez, a buyer for about a dozen Manhattan restaurants, spends the night hunting for the lowest prices matching the highest quality.

" That's my job. To make sure that what I bring the market, to the restaurants today is top quality," Nunez says.

While most New Yorkers sleep, the fishmongers are frantically filleting, selling and packaging seafood.

Around 200-million-pounds a year worth over $1 billion head for mouths across America.

Nunez has been a buyer for over fourteen years, purchases a nightly average of about $10,000 worth of seafood.

Tonight, his hand-written list includes at least 300 pounds of striped bass, but he is not having much luck.

By 2:30 a.m., he hasn't found a single striped bass among dozens of vendors.

" There's so many challenges in this business. First of all you have the weather. Which is pretty ah very key on what you are going to get tonight or tomorrow," Nunez admits.

For Peter Panteleakis and his son buying the freshest fish is a family business.

Panteleakis started coming to the Fulton Fish Market with his father in 1967 when it was located under the Brooklyn Bridge in Manhattan.

"My father, as I told you before is past away a long time ago. He took me to the market in 1967 in the other market, and he teach me all the how they look the fish. How they talk to you. The fish. If they fresh," Panteleakis says with a smile.

Panteleakis says that is where he learned to talk to the fish.

The market moved to its current state of the art location the Bronx in 2005, but the tools of the trade remained the same.

The metal hooks with wooden handles used for everything from lifting the fish to inspecting the gills look like they are right out of a Hollywood horror movie.

But when it comes right down to getting a fresh piece of seafood, Panteleakis says he relies on his senses.

"The fish nice and bright. The stomach it has to be not soft. Gotta be nice and firm. This is nice and fresh fish," Panteleakis points out while squeezing a plump black seas bass.

 

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