A baby girl was not protected from abuse by her parents because of multiple failings by Queensland's child safety department, a watchdog says.

The baby suffered bleeding on the brain, broken legs, haemorrhaging in both eyes and fractured ribs, and 10 child protection workers could face disciplinary action.

A report by the Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian (CCYPCG) says the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services failed the baby multiple times, according to Fairfax.

The report says the department may be liable for legal fees if the child decides to sue for neglect when she is older.

The report says the baby was sent home from hospital with her parents when she was supposed to be taken into child safety protection, and that her parents, in particular her father, had a history of child abuse.

It's claimed an interstate agency had also contacted the department warning them of the unborn child's risk when the girl's mother was pregnant.

But the department failed to issue an Unborn Child High Risk Alert which would have told hospital staff to notify them of the girl's birth.

"The subject child was detrimentally affected by multiple failures in the department's service delivery which amounts to maladministration and requires redress," the CCYPCG's report said.

"... as such, the department has an ongoing responsibility to provide not only ongoing care, protection and therapeutic services for the subject child, but also to ensure access to appropriate legal services and other advice and assistance.

"This will allow the subject child to pursue any legal and other remedies available, at an appropriate age and time."

The department's Ethical Standards Unit as well as the Crime and Misconduct Commission are assessing whether 10 child protection workers should face disciplinary action.

The CCYPCG's recommendations include overhauling practices within the department as well as providing an apology and explanation to the girl when she's old enough.

The girl will remain in care until she turns 18.

 

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