SHOTLIST:

SOURCE - KNXV - COURTESY PHOENIX HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY, COURTESY ABC15.COM THROUGHOUT USE OF VIDEO; EMBARGO ALL OF ARIZONA (Phoenix, Tucson, Flagstaff, Yuma)

Phoenix, Arizona

1. Mid, alligator's prosthetic tail, pan to alligator's head

2. Close, alligator's prosthetic tail, pan to head, zoom out to show almost whole alligator

3. Wide, Alligator swimming

4. SOUNDBITE (no name available)

'you know, he's using those front legs to paddle right now and that's actually very abnormal for an alligator. The staff here spent a long time teaching him to do that because it was the only way he could move in the water. And he's going to have to learn now that by moving that stump around, and there's plenty of muscle mass and bone in that stump, he can get some really nice whipping motion and propulsion from the stump.

5. SOUNDBITE: (no name available) 'you know how he lost his tail originally? It was bitten off by another alligator. Some knothead put him in a pen with other alligators. Big alligators eat little alligators. Can't fix stupid, you just take it out of the breeding pool. People don't know what they're doing, they cause these animals all kinds of grief.'

6. Close, Man holding alligator

7. Close, Man puts down alligator, alligator starts crawling

8 Wide, alligator lying on ground

STORYLINE:

An alligator has a new tail, and a new lease on life. Mr. Stubbs was missing his tail when he arrived at the Phoenix Herpetological Society more than a year ago. Staff members there say he lost the tail when he was put in a pen with other alligators, and a larger alligator bit it off. Mr. Stubbs' prosthetic tail was developed by researchers at the CORE institute and Midwestern University. He's crawling and swims with his front feet, which is unusual for an alligator. Phoneix Herpetological Society staff members say he has enough bone and muscle mass to move the tail in a swishing motion, which would help him swim like able-bodied alligators.

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