The Melbourne City Council plans to crack down on beggars who aggressively confront people in the CBD.

Under the new strategy, problem beggars would be charged and face court.

They could be ordered to undergo compulsory diversion programs, health checks, training and help to find employment.

The anti-begging strategy has been developed in consultation with the Salvation Army and Victoria Police.

The Salvation Army's Major Brendan Nottle says one example is a story about a woman being dragged by the hair in peak hour near Exhibition Street because she refused to give to a beggar.

"They tend to ramp up their aggression which is the real worry," he said.

"It's that sort of behaviour that we want to stop."

Major Nottle says the plan is mainly aimed at helping people in need.

"We want to get all the supports around them that they desperately need," he said.

"What we want to do is get really good mental health and physical health supports around beggars, as well as all stress all the the other issues like accommodation and meals and things like that."

Lord Mayor Robert Doyle says the vast majority of beggars need help.

"They may have substance abuse problems or mental health problems or homelessness problems or a combination of them," he told ABC local radio.

"We can say you're going to be charged but you must go off with a program with Salvos to get some counselling, some public health assessment."