SHOTLIST:

POOL - AP Clients Only

Washington, DC - February 5, 2013

1. Soundbite: (English): Jay Carney, White House press secretary: "We have acknowledged, the United States that sometimes we use remotely piloted aircraft to conduct targeted strikes against specific Al Qaeda terrorists in order to prevent attacks on the United States and to save American lives. We conduct those strikes because they are necessary to mitigate ongoing actual threats, to stop plots, prevent future attacks, and again, save American lives. These strikes are legal, they are ethical, and they are wise."

AP Television - AP Television News Clients Only

New York, NY - February 5, 2013

2. Soundbite: (English): Hina Shamsi, Director National Security Project, American Civil Liberties Union: "It's a chilling document. It goes to the heart of concerns that we have in our democracy about the relationship between the government and citizens, violations of the most fundamental guarantee that the Constitution provides, which is that the government will not take citizens lives without due process of law."

POOL - AP Clients Only

Washington, DC - February 5, 2013

3. Soundbite: (English): Jay Carney, White House press secretary: "As you know, Congress authorized, in an authorization of the use of military force, all military force to be used in our fight against Al Qaeda. And certainly under that authority the President acts in the United States interest to protect the United States and its citizens from Al Qaeda."

AP Television - AP Television News Clients Only

New York, NY - February 5, 2013

4. Soundbite: (English): Hina Shamsi, Director National Security Project, American Civil Liberties Union: "And we're setting a very dangerous precedent when we permit high level officials to kill American citizens and others without review by any court about the standards they're using to take life, or whether the evidentiary basis for their killing decisions is sound or not."

STORYLINE:

An unclassified Justice Department memo reveals that the Obama administration has had more lenient rules than publicly known for when drone attacks can be launched to kill U.S. citizens working abroad with terrorists.

The government does not need evidence that a specific attack is imminent, the newly disclosed Justice Department white paper says, only that the targeted suspect is involved in ongoing plotting against the United States.

"The threat posed by al-Qaida and its associated forces demands a broader concept of imminence in judging when a person continually planning terror attacks presents an imminent threat," the document says.

The undated document surfaced as Obama administration official John Brennan, who helped manage the drone program, heads to Congress on Thursday for his confirmation hearing to become CIA director. The hearing will take place as a growing number of senators are asking to see a still-classified Justice Department legal opinion that justifies the administration's position on drones and is binding on the entire executive branch.