The Queensland government says it hopes to agree on the terms for a new disaster funding deal with the federal government by the end of the week.

The federal and Queensland governments had been blaming each for holding up the deal, called the National Partnership Agreement (NPA).

But state Treasurer Tim Nicholls says he's hopeful terms can be agreed in the next few days.

He says one of the terms he wants guaranteed is that council costs to repair damaged social infrastructure, such as parks and sporting facilities, will be covered.

It's intended that the new deal will be a modification of the NPA that was struck with the former Bligh government after Queensland was hit by floods and Cyclone Yasi in 2011.

"I'm hopeful that the federal government will see their way clear to supporting the recovery effort in Queensland by the end of the week," Mr Nicholls told ABC radio.

On Tuesday, the state treasurer said recovery costs and economic impacts from the latest flood disaster are expected to be more than $2.4 billion.

Meanwhile, the army is preparing to leave the devastated city of Bundaberg after completing their task of repairing major infrastructure.

Army personnel will hold a cricket match and a community event on Wednesday, to say goodbye and good luck.

The army's last major task was to build a temporary bridge to the worst hit area of north Bundaberg.

The federal minister responsible for Queensland's flood recovery, Joe Ludwig, said the state and federal governments met on Tuesday to discuss the deal.

"The state government needs to provide details to the Commonwealth of what assistance they believe is required," Senator Ludwig's office said in a statement.

"The federal government is ready and willing to work with the state government and always has been."

Premier Campbell Newman said "very productive" negotiations were now underway between the state and federal governments.

"That will see not only money coming back to Queensland, as has already been probably promised, but also a deal that sees us helping some of the primary producers that were hit particularly hard," he told reporters on Wednesday.

He said the deal would also allow infrastructure to be built to a better standard.

"I'm sure all Australians, not just Queenslanders, will want to see their money spent in that sort of way," Mr Newman said.

"If the Commonwealth get on and do the sort of things they've been saying and promising we will be able to get the funds to put Queensland back together and that's what we want."

 

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