SHOTLIST:

SOURCE - RESTRICTION: AP Television - AP Clients Only

Location - Date: NEW YORK - Jan. 18

1. SOUNDBITE: Robert Passikoff, president and founder, Brand Keys

"from a brand prospective who's going to say that this was a good think to do? Again If you open the old text book from 1986 about managing corporate reputation, what you're probably looking at is you know what get out there and so some contrition and we'll see if we can't close the door on this event. I don't think it's going away that quickly. The other thing is that there are repercussions that are going to follow this thing. I guess we'll see whether or not the government brings charges against him. Whatever it is it isn't good and whoever he is after this weekend, it's not really anyone that anyone wants associated with their brand because it's only the worst part of him that people are ever going to remember because everything else disappeared. Because it turns out he wasn't a great athlete.

2. SOUNDBITE: Robert Passikoff, president and founder, Brand Keys

"There are more than reasonable, more than viable alternatives if that's what I want to do to donate money. And what we've seen. We've seen over time is that these things have their immediate effects and they have their long-term effects. And I think that in this case you're looking at long, long, long term effects that are not going to help the organization, no matter how good it is, no matter how much good it's done. It's tainted."

3.Various of Passikoff in his office

STORYLINE:

Experts say revelations by cyclist Lance Armstrong that he engaged in doping during his professional career will undoubtedly have a negative effect on Livestrong the charity Armstrong founded.

Armstrong is, "not really anyone that anyone wants associated with their brand because it's only the worst part of him that people are ever going to remember because everything else disappeared," said Robert Pasikoff. Pasikoff is the founder and president of Brand Keys, a New York-based company that researches brand positioning.

Armstrong's admission came during the first of a two-part interview Thursday night with Oprah Winfrey on her OWN network, the disgraced former cycling champion acknowledged what he had lied repeatedly for years,

Armstrong resigned from the board of directors for Livestrong in November after a report by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency accused the cyclist of helping run "the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen" within his U.S. Postal Service and Discovery Channel teams.

Livestrong issued a statement that said the charity was "disappointed by the news that Lance Armstrong misled people during and after his cycling career, including us."

(****END****)

 

Advertisement